Six seven children die after infection with Strep A.

Invasive group A streptococcal disease (iGAS or Strep A) is known to cause scarlet fever, sore throats and, in very rare cases, invasive disease

The UK’s Health Security Agency said six children had died within weeks after being infected with Strep A, and a seventh child had also died.

Invasive group A streptococcal infection — also known as Strep A — is normally mild, but in a small number of cases it can become very serious. Of the six children who died, five were under the age of 10.

The UK Health and Human Services Authority (UKHSA) said parents concerned about their child’s symptoms should seek medical advice. His school in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, announced on 17 November the death of Muhammad Ibrahim Ali, aged four. Health officials have now confirmed that he was infected with Strep A.

According to reports, a 12-year-old schoolboy from London is the seventh child to die after contracting an infection.

Five other pupils have died of infection in the past seven days. One of them was a schoolboy at Ealing in West London. Dr Yemi Chow, Health Protection Adviser at the UK’s Health Security Agency, said: “We are extremely saddened to hear of the death of a child at St John’s Primary School, and we are thinking of their family, friends and the school community. Working with Ealing Council’s public health team, we have provided Preventive advice to the school community to help prevent further cases and we continue to monitor the situation closely.”

Public Health Wales said a girl at Victoria Primary School in Penarth, four miles south of Cardiff, also died from the infection. Dr Ardiana Jenny said Public Health Wales is working with the school to raise awareness of the disease, suggesting people are recognizing symptoms of fever, sore throat, severe muscle pain and redness at the site of the wound.

The doctor said: We extend our deepest condolences to the family, friends and all those affected. Public Health Wales cannot comment on individual cases, and we ask that the family’s privacy be respected.”

Invasive group A streptococcal disease (iGAS or Strep A) is known to cause scarlet fever, sore throats and, in very rare cases, invasive disease

Most people who come into contact with the bacteria remain healthy and are free of symptoms or develop mild throat or skin infections.

Invasive group A streptococcal disease (iGAS or Strep A) is known to cause scarlet fever, sore throats and, in very rare cases, invasive disease. This can happen when bacteria enter parts of the body where they are not normally found, such as the blood, muscles, or lungs.

It can happen if bacteria get past a person’s defenses, for example through an open wound or when a person’s immune system is depleted. This can happen when you are already ill or when receiving treatments, such as some cancer treatments, that affect your immune system. Two of the most severe types of invasive disease are necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome.

Symptoms of invasive disease include fever, severe muscle pain, local muscle tenderness, and redness at the wound site. You should contact your GP or get medical advice by calling 111 immediately if you think you have any of the signs and symptoms of invasive disease. Tell your doctor if you have been in contact with someone who has had group A streptococcus recently.