Alex Scott: Which World Cup expert wears the One Love armband?

Alex Scott, former English footballer turned TV presenter, has been named the BBC’s first female critic in 2018.

The former Arsenal and England footballer wore the symbol as a gesture of support for LGBTQ+ rights. Its decision to do so came after soccer teams in England and Wales chose not to after telling their players they could receive yellow cards for breakingIFA rules.

England, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland and Wales had originally planned to wear the captain’s armband during their matches which is a symbol of inclusion.

Scott, who recently spoke about her sexuality in her memoir How (Not) to Be Strong, said she understands why people want to boycott heroism. Speaking on BBC Sport, she explained, “I totally understand their reasons as well as the whole group of LGBT+ fans from around the world who don’t want to travel here.”

So, who is Alex Scott, how many matches for England has he won and does he have a partner? Here’s everything you need to know.

Who is Alex Scott?

Alex Scott MBE is a former Arsenal and England footballer from London. Scott is of Jamaican descent on her father’s side and discovered her mother’s Jewish heritage on BBC’s Who Do You Think You Are in 2021.

Alex Scott has previously played for Arsenal and England (Picture: Getty Images)

She started playing football for Arsenal at just eight years old and went on to represent the team for the next two decades. Scott also had two years at Birmingham City in 2004 and 2005 and played USA Soccer from 2009 to 2012 before retiring from soccer in 2017.

Scott has 140 caps for England and represented the British football team at the 2012 London Olympics, coming fifth. She was named BBC’s first critic in 2018 and joined the Sky Sports Super Sunday team.

BBC Sports presenter Alex Scott stands by theA Cup on the pitch in 2021 (Photo: Getty Images)

Scott has opened up about the online abuse she faced after taking on these roles. I mentioned before daily Mail She said: “When I retired, I found out I was turning to drinking to try and hide it all, to hide how I was feeling.

“I didn’t tell anyone, I didn’t tell my mother because I didn’t want her to worry or put that pressure on her. I was just that person (who thought) ‘I can take care of myself, I can handle things’ but obviously that’s the wrong way sometimes.

“I got into a dark place and it was around Christmas, and that was when I was like ‘I can’t go on like this, it’s not me, I need to seek help’ and that led me to therapy.”

Scott is currently covering the World Cup in Qatar and has worn a One Love armband, in a gesture of support for LGBTQ+ rights. Its decision came after the England and Wales soccer teams opted not to after telling their players they could receive yellow cards for violatingIFA rules.

Why did she wear the One Love badge?

The BBC pundit decided to wear the One Love armband while covering England’s match against Iran.

Players from England, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland and Wales had originally planned to wear the armband during their matches as a symbol of inclusion. However, they decided against it after players were told they could receive yellow cards for violatingIFA rules.

Although she didn’t directly say why she was wearing the badge, Scott shared a photo of herself wearing it on social media, along with the caption of a heart emoji.

Does she have a partner?

Scott tends to keep her private life out of the public eye, but she revealed details about her relationship with Kelly Smith in her upcoming memoir How (Not) Being Strong.

The couple began a relationship shortly after they signed for Arsenal and stayed together for eight years. Her book mentions the couple’s relationship and Smith’s battle with alcoholism. “Here I was, madly in love for the first time in my life, with an alcoholic,” Scott says in her diary. It didn’t bode well.

What did she say about the Qatar World Cup?

Scott spoke about her decision to present the World Cup in Qatar. The country is notorious for its laws regarding homosexuality, which is illegal and comes with a penalty of three years in prison or a possible death penalty.

The former footballer is aware that many fans will want to boycott the cup this year. Speaking on BBC Sport, she said, “I completely understand their reasons as well as the whole group of fans from all over the world from the LGBT+ community who don’t want to travel here.”

She added, “I’m here because I love my job, and when I think about it, I sit here and have the hardest conversations: We talk about migrant workers, the LGBTQ+ community, we talk about women’s rights.

“I thought about four years ago, I was the BBC’s first female World Cup critic. You think how far we’ve come in four years. Let’s hope, in the next four years, we never have to have these conversations again.”